Thursday, October 15, 2009

Damn!


Not speeding or anything. My front licence plate was crooked! I have been driving the same road with it like this for two years and have been seen by many, many patrol cars and this is the first time they had a problem with it! I just had to laugh. It did make me late for work though.

5 comments:

Todd said...

There are few things in this world that piss me off more than stuff like this thinly veiled "Papers Please" shit. Our bus was pulled over near Memphis for a "DIRTY license plate" and before we knew it there was a full team of cops ripping the bus apart, complete with drug sniffing dog. They never found anything, and the bus wouldn't top 60mph; had to stop us for something! If you haven't read about that one, it's under April on my blog...

Michele said...

I'll have to go and read about that one!
I was the leader of a pack of cars, and was passing a semi when I topped a hill and there he was. I checked my speedo and saw I was doing my usual 78-79mph so slowed to the 75 speed limit. As I passed him, I saw his break lights come on and off, then he pulled out behind the group of cars, passing them all and lighting me up. I wasn't worried, I have current insurance, license, and registration so I really didn't know what he was pulling me over for.
When he said he stopped me to tell me my plate was "about to fall off" I informed him that the holes in the bumper do not match the holes in the plate so I can only attach it with one bolt...which is firmly attached.
He told me it has to be straight. How anal!
Then he noticed my windshield was cracked, too.
In the end, I got a warning for both and was allowed to go on my merry way.

OHN said...

Slow day at the office and he needed something to do between then and end of shift :)

Rock Chef said...

Was he a newbie, eager for a catch? Hope you don't get fined for that sort of thing.

Montana Mountain Man said...

The State Troopers in Montana are just like the Highway Patrol in California. They are AAA with a gun. Their primary function is to respond and investigate accidents and emergencies on state roads and federal highways. Their secondary function is to enforce state traffic laws, so between accidents, they try to keep busy.